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A Couple of Old English Folk Songs


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#1 Alfrún

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 12:51 PM

English Folk Song: 'The Bold Grenadier'

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Lyrics
As I was a walking one morning in May
I spied a young couple a makin' of hay.
O one was a fair maid and her beauty showed clear
and the other was a soldier, a bold grenadier.

Good morning, good morning, good morning said he
O where are you going my pretty lady?
I'm a going a walking by the clear crystal stream
to see cool water glide and hear nightingales sing.

O soldier, o soldier, will you marry me?
O no, my sweet lady that never can be.
For I've got a wife at home in my own country,
Two wives and the army's too many for me.

From the list of folk songs by Roud number:

140. "The Bold Grenadier", "The Nightingale Song" or "One Morning In May" etc. (Laws P14)

Performed By: The Cambridge Singers, With John Rutter




Bob Saget sings an old English folk song
(rude one)

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#2 badger

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 06:42 PM

'The Bold Grenadier' (sung here by Isla Cameron in the film 'Far From the Madding Crowd)



is an Anglecised version of a much older Irish song 'The Nightingale'. This is Luke Kelly from the Dubliners in 1964



My apologies, but I much prefer Luke's version :banghead:
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"And you were planning to build this mosque of yours where, exactly?"


#3 Alfrún

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 09:00 PM

No need to apologise, Badger. .thumbdown Luke's version is indeed a foot tapper; I enjoyed it, myself. I like the haunting beauty of the choir's version, when I'm in a melancholic mood.

One thing...how do get the actual videos to appear, rather than just the link? I managed it once, by accident. .thumbdown
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#4 badger

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 01:11 AM

One thing...how do get the actual videos to appear, rather than just the link? I managed it once, by accident. .thumbdown


Copy and paste the YouTube 'address bar' (at the top of your screen) directly into your post, Alfrun. (or something)

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"And you were planning to build this mosque of yours where, exactly?"


#5 Alfrún

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 10:28 PM

Thanks, I will try that. :lol:
Just practising, Badger.



I thought I had been doing that...obviously not. :) RESULT! .thumbsup
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#6 Alfrún

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 12:56 AM

Folk & Traditional Song Lyrics
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Foggy, Foggy Dew (The Fright'ned Yorkshire Damosel, or, Fear Dispears'd By

Foggy, Foggy Dew (The Fright'Ned Yorkshire Damosel, or, Fear Dispears'd By
Pleasure)
When first I began to court, and pretty young maids to wooe
I could not win the virgin fort, but by the Bogulmaroo.
I kiss'd her in the summer time, and in the cold winter too;
At last I took her in the prime, but by the Bogulmaroo.
My love she was going one Night to bed as she us'd to do,
When on the stairs whe saw a Spright it was the Bogulmaroo.
She came to my chamber-door, and could not tell what to do;
But straight began to weep full sore, for fear of the Bogulmaroo.
At last she came boldly in, tho' still her poor heart did rue
For looking back the Spright did grin O cruel Bogulmaroo.
She started and run in haste, and close to my bed-side drew;
Her eyes she durst not backward cast, for fear of Bogulmaroo.
But into my bed she crept, and did her sorrows renew,
She wrung her hands, and sadly wept, for fear of Bogulmaroo.
I turn'd about to the maid, as lovers are wont to do;
And bid her be no more afraid of th' ugly Bogul
We lay abed next day till ten, for fear of Bogulmaroo.
My love she was all dismay'd, to think of what she had done,
Arise, said I, be not afraid, the Bogulmaroo is gone.
I maarry'd her the next day, and did her pleasures renew;
Each night we spend in charming play,mfor all the Bogulmaroo.
I ne'r said a word of the thing, nor never intend to do;
But ev'ry time she smiles on me, I think of Bogulmaroo.

Printed and Sold by J. Millet, ... 1689.
Bogulmaroo = Buggle/Bugle Bow, or now, Buggabo, was a big black devil that
played tricks on travelers at night. This superstition goes back at least to the
early 17th century. A chapbook published in 1660 was The Meickle Black Diel, or
the Boggle Bo.
"Bugle Bow" was the name of a tune, 1595, and is given in Simpson's BBBM.
Play: Original tune not certainly known, but may be "Ay, marry, and thank you
too", B017-8
To the tune of, I met with a Country Lass, &c. WBO
The Original? RG
DT #333
Laws O3
WBO
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#7 Cynewulf

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 06:42 PM



Another version of the Bold Grenadier
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